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Publication > Issue > Articles

Dehydrator reduces gas consumption

Summary

O. Moore and N. Shannahan of Process Management Engineers provide an update on how their dehydrator can make important energy savings in ammonia plants.

Abstract

With today’s high energy prices of up to $10/million Btu ($39.68/ Gcal), ammonia producers are looking for ways to reduce gas consumption. The dehydrator developed by Process Management Engineers (PME) has been found to be an effective method to do this with an energy saving of up to 0.5 million Btu/short t (0.14 Gcal/t). Further, the simplicity and low cost of the system leads to an attractive payback of one to two years. The dehydrator is patented in North America and several other countries.

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Chemicals from plants?

Summary

High oil and gas prices and environmental considerations are encouraging a closer look at biomass as a feedstock for chemical production.

Abstract

As carbon dioxide emissions from process industries come under ever-closer scrutiny, the prospect of using biomass as a feedstock for chemicals production has loomed larger in the thinking of government and industry alike. However, the technology has many challenges to overcome if it is to gain wide acceptance, the largest of all being price.

Producing chemicals from biological feedstocks can take many forms, from the fermentation process used to make ethanol from sugars or starches, the treatment of vegetable oils to make biodiesel, through enzymatic treatment of plant matter, and gasification of pyrolysed plant material.

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The next step in ammonia plant size

Summary

Single-train ammonia plants have been getting progressively bigger in the past few decades. Lisa Connock examines the main issues in the trend for ever larger ammonia plants and reports on the views of major licensors and operators.

Abstract

Up until the mid to late 1960s, the capacity of ammonia plants was relatively small. Then, with the introduction of turbocompressors for ammonia processing, capacities rapidly increased to about 1,000 t/d. Since then there has been a continuous increase in world-scale plant capacities and that trend continues today. Table 1 shows a recent history of milestones in ammonia plant capacity.

Looking to the future, further moderate in­creases in capacity are expected for conventional plants as well as an increase in the number of very large or mega-scale plants. A mega-scale single train ammonia plant will cover approximately 5% of the traded ammonia market.

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New flowsheet unveiled at urea symposium

Summary

Held every four years, Stamicarbon's urea symposium brings together customers and technology providers to discuss urea technology. This year 250 attendees from 37 countries met in the bracing seaside climate of Noordwijk an See on the Dutch North Sea coast, for three days of papers and functions.

Abstract

Held every four years, Stamicarbon’s urea symposium brings together customers and technology providers to discuss urea technology. This year 250 attendees from 37 countries met in the bracing seaside climate of Noordwijk an See on the Dutch North Sea coast, for three days of papers and functions.

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Innovative ammonia emission reductions

Summary

A new method to reduce ammonia emissions from urea granulation plants is now available from Uhde Fertilizer Technology. Matthias Potthoff of UFT describes the options available and highlights the benefits of the new Ammonia Convert technology.

Abstract

Uhde Fertilizer Technology (UFT) is the leading licensor for urea granulation technology. With more than 50 plants operating worldwide and a market share of more than 80% of fluid bed granulation capacity UFT is well aware of the concerns of the fertilizer industry with respect to emission levels. With current world-scale plant capacities of up to 3,850 t/d for grass root ammonia/urea complexes, the absolute ammonia emissions from a single source (the stack in the urea granulation plant) are significant.

The free ammonia released from the stack is not generated in the urea granulation plant. It is imported with the urea solution from the evaporation section of the urea synthesis plant and is a result of the equilibrium achieved in the evaporation section and is therefore unavoidable. All the free ammonia is released inside the granulator during spraying of the urea solution into the fluidised bed.

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World class urea plants

Summary

Urea production technology is constantly evolving. Nitrogen+Syngas reports on the latest developments that have been made available to the industry, including new process concepts and equipment to reduce emissions, improve plant reliability and safety, and to maximise the full potential of existing urea plants.

Abstract

Urea production technology is constantly evolving. Nitrogen+Syngas reports on the latest developments that have been made available to the industry, including new process concepts and equipment to reduce emissions, improve plant reliability and safety, and to maximise the full potential of existing urea plants.

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